Study will assess effect of working shifts on police officers

SLEEP STUDY: Officers in North Yorkshire to participate in fatigue research

SLEEP STUDY: Officers in North Yorkshire to participate in fatigue research

First published in News
Last updated

A POLICE federation is joining forces with its counterparts from around the country in order to commission to research into the effects that shifts have on its members.

North Yorkshire Police Federation has been joined in the pilot study by several other police federations. It will be carried out by Third Pillar of Health, a company that specialises in research into tiredness and fatigue.

A federation spokesman said: “[We] acknowledge that working shifts is a necessary part of being a police officer.

“We are aware that working shifts has a number of consequences in terms of health, performance as well as professional and personal relationships.

“This will allow us to understand which job roles and shift schedules give rise to the greatest problems and compare the results in North Yorkshire with those in other forces. The aim is to improve the management of fatigue in the future.”

Participating federation members will undertake an online assessment and be able to download their own personal report which will highlight areas where they can make changes to improve their sleep and energy levels during the day.

A spokesman for Third Pillar of Health said: “Anecdotally there appears to be a significant issue with tiredness and fatigue in UK police officers. Together with increased workloads as a result of widespread budget cuts there appears to be rising levels of stress as well as absence.”

Comments (5)

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3:10pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Acer man says...

Good, long overdue & not just for Police; the whole issue of shifts & sleep patterns etc. should be looked at for ALL emergency services.

It doesn't take genius to work out that if a Police officer or nurse/doctor has struggled to get sleep in between night shifts and/or trying to juggle the school runs, the shopping, the housework, & everything else while trying to sleep in broad daylight then as human beings their performance is likely to suffer.

Finding the right balance between what works for a person & what their organisation needs to be able to do its role in society is crucial; again it doesn't take a genius to work out that if the shift pattern is not user friendly then those people who have to work it are likely to be stressed, grumpy & ultimately take more time off - placing yet more burdens on those left behind who, if already not happy with the shift patterns, stressed & tired etc. are likely to get more stressed leading to more time off; can you see the vicious circle emerging here???

It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 then clearly something needs to be done.
Good, long overdue & not just for Police; the whole issue of shifts & sleep patterns etc. should be looked at for ALL emergency services. It doesn't take genius to work out that if a Police officer or nurse/doctor has struggled to get sleep in between night shifts and/or trying to juggle the school runs, the shopping, the housework, & everything else while trying to sleep in broad daylight then as human beings their performance is likely to suffer. Finding the right balance between what works for a person & what their organisation needs to be able to do its role in society is crucial; again it doesn't take a genius to work out that if the shift pattern is not user friendly then those people who have to work it are likely to be stressed, grumpy & ultimately take more time off - placing yet more burdens on those left behind who, if already not happy with the shift patterns, stressed & tired etc. are likely to get more stressed leading to more time off; can you see the vicious circle emerging here??? It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 then clearly something needs to be done. Acer man
  • Score: 7

3:20pm Tue 2 Sep 14

The Grim North says...

" It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 " - probably caused by spending most of their working lives either sat behind a desk doing paperwork (altering or shredding witness statements in the case of South Yorkshire police) or sat in car.
" It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 " - probably caused by spending most of their working lives either sat behind a desk doing paperwork (altering or shredding witness statements in the case of South Yorkshire police) or sat in car. The Grim North
  • Score: -11

10:37pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Acer man says...

The Grim North wrote:
" It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 " - probably caused by spending most of their working lives either sat behind a desk doing paperwork (altering or shredding witness statements in the case of South Yorkshire police) or sat in car.
So, now all officers are corrupt are they???

That seems to be the gist of your post, ALL officers are lazy, alter their paperwork & statements or just drive around aimlessly in a car???

This is a serious study into something that needs addressing, average life expectancy of a Police officer was up until recently only 7 years post retirement; typically dead by 62. I know it has improved slightly since then but still, the "average" means most are gone by 70.

If you want to spout out from behind your keyboard then that's fine, but hopefully when you need an officer firstly they will get out from behind their desk to come & see you, secondly they'll make a good job of any associated paperwork and thirdly they won't be too tired & stressed from whichever shift pattern they're doing to actually give you the service you demand from them.

Perhaps you could show them your post (above) by way of motivation??? I'm sure they'll still treat you with respect & give you a quality of service regardless of their personal views of you, maybe you should do likewise & show a little respect in return.
[quote][p][bold]The Grim North[/bold] wrote: " It does amaze me that the average life expectancy of a Police officer post retirement is still considerably less than the average and given that they HAVE to retire at 55 " - probably caused by spending most of their working lives either sat behind a desk doing paperwork (altering or shredding witness statements in the case of South Yorkshire police) or sat in car.[/p][/quote]So, now all officers are corrupt are they??? That seems to be the gist of your post, ALL officers are lazy, alter their paperwork & statements or just drive around aimlessly in a car??? This is a serious study into something that needs addressing, average life expectancy of a Police officer was up until recently only 7 years post retirement; typically dead by 62. I know it has improved slightly since then but still, the "average" means most are gone by 70. If you want to spout out from behind your keyboard then that's fine, but hopefully when you need an officer firstly they will get out from behind their desk to come & see you, secondly they'll make a good job of any associated paperwork and thirdly they won't be too tired & stressed from whichever shift pattern they're doing to actually give you the service you demand from them. Perhaps you could show them your post (above) by way of motivation??? I'm sure they'll still treat you with respect & give you a quality of service regardless of their personal views of you, maybe you should do likewise & show a little respect in return. Acer man
  • Score: 6

9:33am Wed 3 Sep 14

reasoned view says...

How would the Federation know about shifts I wonder?
How would the Federation know about shifts I wonder? reasoned view
  • Score: 1

2:49pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Factspeakvolumes says...

reasoned view wrote:
How would the Federation know about shifts I wonder?
From 22 years of working them
[quote][p][bold]reasoned view[/bold] wrote: How would the Federation know about shifts I wonder?[/p][/quote]From 22 years of working them Factspeakvolumes
  • Score: 3

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