Biker calls for more awareness on the roads

SERIOUS INJURIES: David Lodge manages a smile from his hospital bed despite suffering multiple injuries

SERIOUS INJURIES: David Lodge manages a smile from his hospital bed despite suffering multiple injuries

First published in News

A BIKER left with life-threatening injuries when a careless driver hit him on the A696 has called for more awareness of motorcyclists among motorists.

David Lodge, 50, of Darlington was riding his Honda CBR110 Blackbird motorbike with his wife Tracey travelling as pillion passenger when a driver veered into their path.

Mr Lodge was lucky to survive the crash and spent 17 days in an induced coma after being airlifted to the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle.

He was later transferred to James Cook Hospital in Middlesbrough to continue his recovery from many serious injuries, including fractures to his spine, face, ribs, right hip and ankle.

His wife Tracey, 50, suffered from a fractured wrist, leg and foot.

The car driver was convicted of driving without due care and attention and received six penalty points and £1,400 in fines and costs.

Mr Lodge is still need of rehabilitation therapy following the incident last August and has called for more awareness among motorists to prevent such collisions.

He said: “Too many road users just don’t check their mirrors and all drivers should take more care to watch out for motorbikes, and cyclists as well.

“As a taxi driver and biker in my spare time I consider myself to be an experienced driver and I know all too well how vulnerable bikers are on the roads.

“We should be able to share the road space with other vehicles just fine and its important people take note of my story as I wouldn’t want anyone to have to go through what we have.”

Specialist lawyers at Irwin Mitchell’s Newcastle office are continuing to work on Mr Lodge’s behalf to secure funds for his continued physiotherapy from the car driver’s insurance company.

Comments (56)

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7:46pm Sun 1 Jun 14

melsonby says...

Pot, kettle and black come to mind! Whilst I agree that all road users should watch out for each other, there are still too many bikers who drive dangerously and give the majority a bad name., especially in North Yorkshire!
Pot, kettle and black come to mind! Whilst I agree that all road users should watch out for each other, there are still too many bikers who drive dangerously and give the majority a bad name., especially in North Yorkshire! melsonby
  • Score: -1

8:12pm Sun 1 Jun 14

JJ2000 says...

Northallerton road and the areas around dalton, paddock farm and Cowtons are horrific for brainless bikers who think they're TT material.
On woodlands road in Darlington this evening there was a goon on a bike weaving in and out of cars while traveling at speed.
The actions of these people reflect on all bikers, whether sensible or not.
Northallerton road and the areas around dalton, paddock farm and Cowtons are horrific for brainless bikers who think they're TT material. On woodlands road in Darlington this evening there was a goon on a bike weaving in and out of cars while traveling at speed. The actions of these people reflect on all bikers, whether sensible or not. JJ2000
  • Score: 11

10:15pm Sun 1 Jun 14

mallymole says...

As i & my wife where out & about to-day the number of idiots driving cars was unbeliving passing when other cars coming towards us ,cutting us up not allowing enough room when passing,also cyclists riding to-far out not looking were they are going head down &riding two & three abreast,will not move over just stick their fingers up at you,car drivers to impatient taken to many chances no wonder there is road rage; as soon as the sun comes out they go mad not a thought for anybody but them selves;;
As i & my wife where out & about to-day the number of idiots driving cars was unbeliving passing when other cars coming towards us ,cutting us up not allowing enough room when passing,also cyclists riding to-far out not looking were they are going head down &riding two & three abreast,will not move over just stick their fingers up at you,car drivers to impatient taken to many chances no wonder there is road rage; as soon as the sun comes out they go mad not a thought for anybody but them selves;; mallymole
  • Score: 12

11:46pm Sun 1 Jun 14

Homshaw1 says...

Riding motorcycles must be good fun but you have little protection. Does it matter whose fault the accident is? If there is a collision they are going to come out of it badly
Riding motorcycles must be good fun but you have little protection. Does it matter whose fault the accident is? If there is a collision they are going to come out of it badly Homshaw1
  • Score: 8

11:51pm Sun 1 Jun 14

Homshaw1 says...

Taxi drivers are amongst the worst drivers on the road.
Taxi drivers are amongst the worst drivers on the road. Homshaw1
  • Score: 31

7:29am Mon 2 Jun 14

Jonn says...

Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights. Jonn
  • Score: -34

8:12am Mon 2 Jun 14

Yemen says...

Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to.

if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you.

"colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights."
[quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to. if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you. "colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights." Yemen
  • Score: 18

11:30am Mon 2 Jun 14

durhamchap says...

I'm both a biker and a car driver and have seen stupid driving by people on both two & four wheels.The list of speed camera points appears weekly and we usually get people complaining on the forum. I'm not hypocritical to say I never go above the speed limit but always try to keep to 30mph where indicated but often see car drivers and bikers way over the limits and then start moaning when they are caught.
I know Police forces have drastically cut their road policing budgets so we see fewer traffic officers so nobody to stop these idiots - perhaps a retrograde step by the Police forced on them by budget cuts,but I really believe more patrols would improve the situation on our roads - I know I would rather speak to a police officer who can use his discretion about prosecution rather than a camera though I'm not arguing for cameras to be removed where necessary.
I'm both a biker and a car driver and have seen stupid driving by people on both two & four wheels.The list of speed camera points appears weekly and we usually get people complaining on the forum. I'm not hypocritical to say I never go above the speed limit but always try to keep to 30mph where indicated but often see car drivers and bikers way over the limits and then start moaning when they are caught. I know Police forces have drastically cut their road policing budgets so we see fewer traffic officers so nobody to stop these idiots - perhaps a retrograde step by the Police forced on them by budget cuts,but I really believe more patrols would improve the situation on our roads - I know I would rather speak to a police officer who can use his discretion about prosecution rather than a camera though I'm not arguing for cameras to be removed where necessary. durhamchap
  • Score: 16

11:37am Mon 2 Jun 14

Rich Mond says...

Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning.

...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all.

Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers.
[quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning. ...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all. Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers. Rich Mond
  • Score: 38

1:38pm Mon 2 Jun 14

ianh says...

I find it appalling, but sadly not surprising, that Mr Lodges entirely reasonable call for more understanding on our roads (by all road users) can be met with yet more abuse of motorcyclists.

Mr Lodge has allowed circulation of CCTV coverage of the accident as a warning to others and can be seen at www.youtube.com/watc
h?v=yAX2HsJ7fxI

This rider was almost killed by a car turning right across his path.The police confirmed mr Lodge was not speeding and was in no way at fault.

That this driver received a fine and just 6 points is criminal in itself.

For the typically ignorant out there, It should be noted that daytime running lights have been fitted to all new bikes for a number of years. However no amount of lights or high viz will help if the offending driver does not look in the first place.
I find it appalling, but sadly not surprising, that Mr Lodges entirely reasonable call for more understanding on our roads (by all road users) can be met with yet more abuse of motorcyclists. Mr Lodge has allowed circulation of CCTV coverage of the accident as a warning to others and can be seen at www.youtube.com/watc h?v=yAX2HsJ7fxI This rider was almost killed by a car turning right across his path.The police confirmed mr Lodge was not speeding and was in no way at fault. That this driver received a fine and just 6 points is criminal in itself. For the typically ignorant out there, It should be noted that daytime running lights have been fitted to all new bikes for a number of years. However no amount of lights or high viz will help if the offending driver does not look in the first place. ianh
  • Score: 32

4:38pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Homshaw1 says...

Nobody deliberately tries to injure anyone. People make mistakes - both cyclists and motorists. They always have and always will. In two weeks this article will be a distant memory for most people. Unfortunate but true.

If you ride a motorbike or a bicycle you have little protection and there is a chance of being injured whether it's your fault or not.

If you want to ride a bike or a motorbike be aware of the risk. It isn't going to go away.
Nobody deliberately tries to injure anyone. People make mistakes - both cyclists and motorists. They always have and always will. In two weeks this article will be a distant memory for most people. Unfortunate but true. If you ride a motorbike or a bicycle you have little protection and there is a chance of being injured whether it's your fault or not. If you want to ride a bike or a motorbike be aware of the risk. It isn't going to go away. Homshaw1
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Mon 2 Jun 14

ianh says...

Anyone who has ridden bikes for any period of time is all too aware of the risks involved. The enjoyment to be taken from riding makes it worthwhile.

However it is all too easy to say mistakes happen. In truth some people take the responsibility involved in driving a vehicle far too lightly. This lack of accountability will not be helped by the shamefully inadequate penalty this driver received.
Had he been drinking, but not hurt anyone, his penalty would have been far more severe.
Anyone who has ridden bikes for any period of time is all too aware of the risks involved. The enjoyment to be taken from riding makes it worthwhile. However it is all too easy to say mistakes happen. In truth some people take the responsibility involved in driving a vehicle far too lightly. This lack of accountability will not be helped by the shamefully inadequate penalty this driver received. Had he been drinking, but not hurt anyone, his penalty would have been far more severe. ianh
  • Score: 9

5:29pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Jonn says...

Yemen wrote:
Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to.

if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you.

"colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights."
What a rediculous suggestion.
[quote][p][bold]Yemen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to. if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you. "colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights."[/p][/quote]What a rediculous suggestion. Jonn
  • Score: -4

5:31pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Jonn says...

Rich Mond wrote:
Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning.

...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all.

Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers.
Really? How many Police motorcyclists are involved in accidents then?
[quote][p][bold]Rich Mond[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning. ...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all. Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers.[/p][/quote]Really? How many Police motorcyclists are involved in accidents then? Jonn
  • Score: -11

7:46am Tue 3 Jun 14

Yemen says...

Jonn wrote:
Yemen wrote:
Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to.

if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you.

"colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights."
What a rediculous suggestion.
not at all 'rediculous' its a well known and tested method of checking a statement so see if its racist, bigoted or in fact just plain ridiculous....
[quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yemen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]you sound like the quintessential bigot that this article is intended on speaking to. if you think you are not a just re-read your letter substituting 'black' or 'homosexual' or any other minority... in fact here ill do it for you. "colored people are just 1% of all drivers so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a mode of transport on roads dominated by white people. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, colored people come off worse. All colored people should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights."[/p][/quote]What a rediculous suggestion.[/p][/quote]not at all 'rediculous' its a well known and tested method of checking a statement so see if its racist, bigoted or in fact just plain ridiculous.... Yemen
  • Score: 1

2:16pm Tue 3 Jun 14

Homshaw1 says...

Well known and tested it may or not be. I have to agree it is a daft analogy
Well known and tested it may or not be. I have to agree it is a daft analogy Homshaw1
  • Score: 4

3:25pm Tue 3 Jun 14

Bigbrowndog79 says...

I can't stand the way that the emphasis on road using responsibility is constantly placed on the car drivers! Granted I have witnessed countless of stupid drivers using their cars as if their journey MUST be more important than others but when it comes to downright dangerous, I have witnessed FAR more bikers riding with total disregard for all other road users.
I know there may well be the odd one (and I really do mean the ODD one!) who rides within the laws of the road but on the whole they are far to rude and ignorant to obey these rules like we all should.
I can honestly say that I have never seen a motorcyclist stick to the speed limit on any class of road. I have seen countless ones putting the lives of others and less importantly in my opinion, their own, at high risk with outrageous maneuvers. Despite this it's always the same old story "CAR DRIVERS BE AWARE!" "LOOK OUT FOR BIKERS" "BEWARE OF MOTORCYCLISTS!" and I'm sick of it.
A much harder stance needs to be taken on how bikers use the roads. I understand how motorcycles are supposed to be about adrenaline and that's fine, but just don't do it on the roads where there are laws in place and all you bikers might not know this but THEY APPLY TO YOU ALL TOO! If you want to thrash about at high speed, go and hire a track that's built for this kind of thing!
I can't stand the way that the emphasis on road using responsibility is constantly placed on the car drivers! Granted I have witnessed countless of stupid drivers using their cars as if their journey MUST be more important than others but when it comes to downright dangerous, I have witnessed FAR more bikers riding with total disregard for all other road users. I know there may well be the odd one (and I really do mean the ODD one!) who rides within the laws of the road but on the whole they are far to rude and ignorant to obey these rules like we all should. I can honestly say that I have never seen a motorcyclist stick to the speed limit on any class of road. I have seen countless ones putting the lives of others and less importantly in my opinion, their own, at high risk with outrageous maneuvers. Despite this it's always the same old story "CAR DRIVERS BE AWARE!" "LOOK OUT FOR BIKERS" "BEWARE OF MOTORCYCLISTS!" and I'm sick of it. A much harder stance needs to be taken on how bikers use the roads. I understand how motorcycles are supposed to be about adrenaline and that's fine, but just don't do it on the roads where there are laws in place and all you bikers might not know this but THEY APPLY TO YOU ALL TOO! If you want to thrash about at high speed, go and hire a track that's built for this kind of thing! Bigbrowndog79
  • Score: -26

4:09pm Tue 3 Jun 14

ianh says...

It is a responsibility of ALL of us to be aware of vulnerable road users.
. Like most motorcyclists i also drive a car, in my case approx 30k a year all around the uk so i think i have a reasonable perspective.

Regardless of whether other road users are acting responsibly (in your opinion) it still down to you to be alert and aware of potential hazards to you and other road users around you.

I am afraid your attitude goes a long way to explaining why the likes of Mr Lodge needs to make such a plee for better understanding between road users.
It is a responsibility of ALL of us to be aware of vulnerable road users. . Like most motorcyclists i also drive a car, in my case approx 30k a year all around the uk so i think i have a reasonable perspective. Regardless of whether other road users are acting responsibly (in your opinion) it still down to you to be alert and aware of potential hazards to you and other road users around you. I am afraid your attitude goes a long way to explaining why the likes of Mr Lodge needs to make such a plee for better understanding between road users. ianh
  • Score: 16

7:14pm Tue 3 Jun 14

The Sleeper says...

I have both car and motorcycle categories on my driving licence and use both on a regular basis. Yes both can show poor regard for each other which is a shame. However last year over 70 per cent of road collisions in North Yorkshire involving motorcycles showed that the motorcyclist was to blame. Yes that shows the other less than 30 per cent the other vehicle user type was to blame. Most collisions involve poor cornering, overtaking or excess speed.
Try driving up Weardale or Wensleydale on a weekend and who are the ones speeding in the national speed limit areas. Yes the motorcyclists.. When I'm doing 60mph I am often passed by bikes at very high speed. It is not all bikers but they do give the rest a bad name. The police have dealt with biker in excess of 100mph on our rural roads, no wonder car drivers do not see them when the limit is 60mph. I am not anti biker but some of them need to wise up or it may be a one way ride..
I have both car and motorcycle categories on my driving licence and use both on a regular basis. Yes both can show poor regard for each other which is a shame. However last year over 70 per cent of road collisions in North Yorkshire involving motorcycles showed that the motorcyclist was to blame. Yes that shows the other less than 30 per cent the other vehicle user type was to blame. Most collisions involve poor cornering, overtaking or excess speed. Try driving up Weardale or Wensleydale on a weekend and who are the ones speeding in the national speed limit areas. Yes the motorcyclists.. When I'm doing 60mph I am often passed by bikes at very high speed. It is not all bikers but they do give the rest a bad name. The police have dealt with biker in excess of 100mph on our rural roads, no wonder car drivers do not see them when the limit is 60mph. I am not anti biker but some of them need to wise up or it may be a one way ride.. The Sleeper
  • Score: 9

11:17pm Tue 3 Jun 14

spragger says...

That is rich, like the first buds of spring, they appear on our roads around 1st April the 'born again bikers'
Overtaking on blind bends nipping between lines of cars, speeding etc.
Hold a mirror up first
That is rich, like the first buds of spring, they appear on our roads around 1st April the 'born again bikers' Overtaking on blind bends nipping between lines of cars, speeding etc. Hold a mirror up first spragger
  • Score: -5

12:38am Wed 4 Jun 14

tomtopper says...

Jonn wrote:
Rich Mond wrote:
Jonn wrote:
Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse.
All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.
Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning.

...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all.

Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers.
Really? How many Police motorcyclists are involved in accidents then?
Not a lot... Because they ride by the system (Roadcraft)...

What kills isn't speed per se ( a bike can accelerate and decelerate from post 100 mph in seconds and relatively safely).. What kills is surprise and surprise usually occurs when one isn't driving/riding to the conditions..

As driving a car becomes more and more like sitting in comfort in the living room at home with a multitude of distractions, this problem will only get worse
[quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Rich Mond[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jonn[/bold] wrote: Motorcyclists are just 1% of all road users so they need to wake up to the fact that they are a very tiny minority, using a very vulnerable mode of transport on roads dominated by much larger vehicles. Accidents are bound to happen but unfortunately, motorcyclists come off worse. All motorcylists should be required to wear High Viz Jackets and use daytime lights.[/p][/quote]Even when riding a big white motorcycle that has blue and yellow stripes on it, a Hi-Viz jacket, light coloured helmet and lights on, you would be surprised how many driver still have not looked before moving lanes or turning. ...... of course, if you were a motorcycle rider you would not be surprised at all. Police riders will also tell you even their blue lights on does not help with some drivers.[/p][/quote]Really? How many Police motorcyclists are involved in accidents then?[/p][/quote]Not a lot... Because they ride by the system (Roadcraft)... What kills isn't speed per se ( a bike can accelerate and decelerate from post 100 mph in seconds and relatively safely).. What kills is surprise and surprise usually occurs when one isn't driving/riding to the conditions.. As driving a car becomes more and more like sitting in comfort in the living room at home with a multitude of distractions, this problem will only get worse tomtopper
  • Score: 10

9:37am Wed 4 Jun 14

studio says...

" Check Your Mirrors "

There is no need, generally the biker is usually close enough to the back of my car to have a conversation with them.

99% of bikers are adrenaline junkies who couldnt give two hoots about anyone else on the road.

You want respect on the road... Earn it.
" Check Your Mirrors " There is no need, generally the biker is usually close enough to the back of my car to have a conversation with them. 99% of bikers are adrenaline junkies who couldnt give two hoots about anyone else on the road. You want respect on the road... Earn it. studio
  • Score: -29

10:01am Wed 4 Jun 14

Triglet says...

Get the track days back at Croft this will get rid of any aggressive riding thats in the system (if any) and could result in a reduction of casualties.
Get the track days back at Croft this will get rid of any aggressive riding thats in the system (if any) and could result in a reduction of casualties. Triglet
  • Score: 2

11:25am Wed 4 Jun 14

Trada says...

What a lot of fools commenting here. Does it matter what bikers do on the road? Does it matter how big he is? Does it matter how visible he is? Does it matter what you think about bikers in general? I'm a part time biker, call me what you want, blast your horn at me, flash your lights at me, hate me as much as you want I don't care. As long as you know I and others exist you will be aware of us. That is all this biker asking, " Please be Aware".
On a second note, if that collision had happened less than a second later the Brazilian drivers new wife, who was passenger in the car, would probably have been critical in hospital at the same time. Point being, just because you think your safe in a car, your not.
What a lot of fools commenting here. Does it matter what bikers do on the road? Does it matter how big he is? Does it matter how visible he is? Does it matter what you think about bikers in general? I'm a part time biker, call me what you want, blast your horn at me, flash your lights at me, hate me as much as you want I don't care. As long as you know I and others exist you will be aware of us. That is all this biker asking, " Please be Aware". On a second note, if that collision had happened less than a second later the Brazilian drivers new wife, who was passenger in the car, would probably have been critical in hospital at the same time. Point being, just because you think your safe in a car, your not. Trada
  • Score: 1

3:15pm Wed 4 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
What a lot of fools commenting here. Does it matter what bikers do on the road? Does it matter how big he is? Does it matter how visible he is? Does it matter what you think about bikers in general? I'm a part time biker, call me what you want, blast your horn at me, flash your lights at me, hate me as much as you want I don't care. As long as you know I and others exist you will be aware of us. That is all this biker asking, " Please be Aware". On a second note, if that collision had happened less than a second later the Brazilian drivers new wife, who was passenger in the car, would probably have been critical in hospital at the same time. Point being, just because you think your safe in a car, your not.
Does it matter what bikers do on the road?.... Yes.

Am i aware of bikers on the road?.... Yes.

Am i safe in my car?... Yes, also warm and dry.

Nobody "Hates" people because they are a biker. Its just unfortunate that some spoil things for everyone. Unfortunatly thats just a way of life.

For the record - "You`re" safe in a car & "you`re" not.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: What a lot of fools commenting here. Does it matter what bikers do on the road? Does it matter how big he is? Does it matter how visible he is? Does it matter what you think about bikers in general? I'm a part time biker, call me what you want, blast your horn at me, flash your lights at me, hate me as much as you want I don't care. As long as you know I and others exist you will be aware of us. That is all this biker asking, " Please be Aware". On a second note, if that collision had happened less than a second later the Brazilian drivers new wife, who was passenger in the car, would probably have been critical in hospital at the same time. Point being, just because you think your safe in a car, your not.[/p][/quote]Does it matter what bikers do on the road?.... Yes. Am i aware of bikers on the road?.... Yes. Am i safe in my car?... Yes, also warm and dry. Nobody "Hates" people because they are a biker. Its just unfortunate that some spoil things for everyone. Unfortunatly thats just a way of life. For the record - "You`re" safe in a car & "you`re" not. studio
  • Score: -6

4:13pm Wed 4 Jun 14

Yemen says...

studio wrote:
" Check Your Mirrors "

There is no need, generally the biker is usually close enough to the back of my car to have a conversation with them.

99% of bikers are adrenaline junkies who couldnt give two hoots about anyone else on the road.

You want respect on the road... Earn it.
Got a source for you 99% claim ?

You want credibility for you statements .... prove it !
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: " Check Your Mirrors " There is no need, generally the biker is usually close enough to the back of my car to have a conversation with them. 99% of bikers are adrenaline junkies who couldnt give two hoots about anyone else on the road. You want respect on the road... Earn it.[/p][/quote]Got a source for you 99% claim ? You want credibility for you statements .... prove it ! Yemen
  • Score: 0

5:57pm Wed 4 Jun 14

Trada says...

Studio is obviously someone who has never lived in the real world. Why does it bother you what others do if it doesn't hurt you or anyone else.
You may think you are aware of others on the road but this proves some are not, therefore this article is not aimed at people like you who are perfect.
Safe in your car, definitely not. If that bike had hit the car door rather the front wing it would definitely have broken the passengers legs and probably her pelvis as well. That's a split second or 4 feet difference, pure luck on her side.
Warm and dry. I have waterproofs for when it's raining so I'm dry. I have leather clothes on so I'm warm, your point is?
Respect on the road. Why should I earn it? You don't know me, you don't know how I ride. What gives you the right to think you are better than me? You just hate people who are different to you and that's sad.
Studio is obviously someone who has never lived in the real world. Why does it bother you what others do if it doesn't hurt you or anyone else. You may think you are aware of others on the road but this proves some are not, therefore this article is not aimed at people like you who are perfect. Safe in your car, definitely not. If that bike had hit the car door rather the front wing it would definitely have broken the passengers legs and probably her pelvis as well. That's a split second or 4 feet difference, pure luck on her side. Warm and dry. I have waterproofs for when it's raining so I'm dry. I have leather clothes on so I'm warm, your point is? Respect on the road. Why should I earn it? You don't know me, you don't know how I ride. What gives you the right to think you are better than me? You just hate people who are different to you and that's sad. Trada
  • Score: 6

6:14pm Wed 4 Jun 14

Trada says...

Copied from a legal web site.....
The figures also show that 48% of crashes between motorcycles and cars were the result of the car driver failing to look properly.

Failing to look properly was the most frequent cause of crashes for all vehicles except motorcycles. Motorcyclists were most likely to crash through ‘loss of control’ and also most likely to be the victim of someone else failing to look.
Studio this doesn't apply to you because are obviously perfect and never break the law.

Please, as this article asks, be aware, look out for bikes. This includes push bikes as well as motor bikes, and everyone else on the road.
Copied from a legal web site..... The figures also show that 48% of crashes between motorcycles and cars were the result of the car driver failing to look properly. Failing to look properly was the most frequent cause of crashes for all vehicles except motorcycles. Motorcyclists were most likely to crash through ‘loss of control’ and also most likely to be the victim of someone else failing to look. Studio this doesn't apply to you because are obviously perfect and never break the law. Please, as this article asks, be aware, look out for bikes. This includes push bikes as well as motor bikes, and everyone else on the road. Trada
  • Score: 6

8:07pm Wed 4 Jun 14

tomtopper says...

Most car drivers are insulated from road conditions , everything's quiet and power assisted, with quality entertainment systems all of which tends to dull a drivers awareness.. Bikers are generally ore switched on, feeling the road as they ride.. The old adage rings true..Think once, think twice, think bike...

Most bikers I've seen use acceleration in bursts as opposed to flat out, however the phenomonal acceleration is sometimes over used for more risky overtakes and in dodgy road conditions by the inexperienced or reckless rider who usually rides occasionally.. It's switched off motorists and the element of surprise which makes things dangerous for bikers
Most car drivers are insulated from road conditions , everything's quiet and power assisted, with quality entertainment systems all of which tends to dull a drivers awareness.. Bikers are generally ore switched on, feeling the road as they ride.. The old adage rings true..Think once, think twice, think bike... Most bikers I've seen use acceleration in bursts as opposed to flat out, however the phenomonal acceleration is sometimes over used for more risky overtakes and in dodgy road conditions by the inexperienced or reckless rider who usually rides occasionally.. It's switched off motorists and the element of surprise which makes things dangerous for bikers tomtopper
  • Score: 4

8:22pm Wed 4 Jun 14

Trada says...

I agree to an extent. But nobody has said anything about dangerous or speeding drivers.
Fact, the fastest car driver caught speeding in a 30mph zone was in Gateshead just up the road, he was charged with doing 94mph in a 30mph zone. It's not only bikes that have power and speed.
I agree to an extent. But nobody has said anything about dangerous or speeding drivers. Fact, the fastest car driver caught speeding in a 30mph zone was in Gateshead just up the road, he was charged with doing 94mph in a 30mph zone. It's not only bikes that have power and speed. Trada
  • Score: 8

11:31am Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
I agree to an extent. But nobody has said anything about dangerous or speeding drivers. Fact, the fastest car driver caught speeding in a 30mph zone was in Gateshead just up the road, he was charged with doing 94mph in a 30mph zone. It's not only bikes that have power and speed.
And the fastest speed ever recorded on a bike? I think it was over 170mph.

No, i dont have proof of my 99% claim. That would be hard. Cant be far from the truth though. Do you have proof of your claim regarding broken bones? Surely this claim would depend on what car i have?

For the record, i dont hate anyone, maybe thats my problem.

And I`m the first to admit im not perfect. Pretty close though.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: I agree to an extent. But nobody has said anything about dangerous or speeding drivers. Fact, the fastest car driver caught speeding in a 30mph zone was in Gateshead just up the road, he was charged with doing 94mph in a 30mph zone. It's not only bikes that have power and speed.[/p][/quote]And the fastest speed ever recorded on a bike? I think it was over 170mph. No, i dont have proof of my 99% claim. That would be hard. Cant be far from the truth though. Do you have proof of your claim regarding broken bones? Surely this claim would depend on what car i have? For the record, i dont hate anyone, maybe thats my problem. And I`m the first to admit im not perfect. Pretty close though. studio
  • Score: -2

12:34pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

1.the speed I mentioned was in a 30mph zone not a total overall like yours. So for for comparison finish your statement and tell the fastest speeding car driver.
2. I never mentioned "your" car, but I have seen that car involved and can say for definite that passenger would of ended up in hospital if the impact happened in the door not the wing.
3. Hate might have been a strong word but obviously think your better than motorcycle riders saying they have to earn your respect.
4. You think your a good driver, pretty close to perfect, what gives you the right to say that?
5. You and many have turned this story into anti-biker, anti-taxi driver. Why not just have respect for other road users and be aware of what's happening around you like asked?
1.the speed I mentioned was in a 30mph zone not a total overall like yours. So for for comparison finish your statement and tell the fastest speeding car driver. 2. I never mentioned "your" car, but I have seen that car involved and can say for definite that passenger would of ended up in hospital if the impact happened in the door not the wing. 3. Hate might have been a strong word but obviously think your better than motorcycle riders saying they have to earn your respect. 4. You think your a good driver, pretty close to perfect, what gives you the right to say that? 5. You and many have turned this story into anti-biker, anti-taxi driver. Why not just have respect for other road users and be aware of what's happening around you like asked? Trada
  • Score: 5

12:44pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

I've done the work for you....
The fastest convicted speeder in the UK was Daniel Nicks, convicted of 175 mph (282 km/h) on a Honda Fireblade motorcycle in 2000. He received six weeks in jail and was banned from driving for two years. The fastest UK speeder in a car was Timothy Brady, caught driving a 3.6-litre Porsche 911 Turbo at 172 mph (277 km/h) on the A420 in Oxfordshire in January 2007 and jailed for 10 weeks and banned from driving for 3 years.

So does 3mph make that biker and 99% of all bikers adrenalin junkies! and all car drivers not perfect, but pretty close and deserve the respect of bike riders?
I've done the work for you.... The fastest convicted speeder in the UK was Daniel Nicks, convicted of 175 mph (282 km/h) on a Honda Fireblade motorcycle in 2000. He received six weeks in jail and was banned from driving for two years.[1] The fastest UK speeder in a car was Timothy Brady, caught driving a 3.6-litre Porsche 911 Turbo at 172 mph (277 km/h) on the A420 in Oxfordshire in January 2007 and jailed for 10 weeks and banned from driving for 3 years.[2] So does 3mph make that biker and 99% of all bikers adrenalin junkies! and all car drivers not perfect, but pretty close and deserve the respect of bike riders? Trada
  • Score: 1

1:09pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
1.the speed I mentioned was in a 30mph zone not a total overall like yours. So for for comparison finish your statement and tell the fastest speeding car driver. 2. I never mentioned "your" car, but I have seen that car involved and can say for definite that passenger would of ended up in hospital if the impact happened in the door not the wing. 3. Hate might have been a strong word but obviously think your better than motorcycle riders saying they have to earn your respect. 4. You think your a good driver, pretty close to perfect, what gives you the right to say that? 5. You and many have turned this story into anti-biker, anti-taxi driver. Why not just have respect for other road users and be aware of what's happening around you like asked?
Apologies, clearly i have upset you, with MY opinions.

If the passenger in that car was to be badly injured, clearly the biker was going to fast.

I`m not anti biker, I`m not anti taxi driver, I`m anti law breaking driver ( bike or car )

Massive respect to other road users. all of them, truck, car, van and bike.

Get off your high horse. i was simply stating the obvious.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: 1.the speed I mentioned was in a 30mph zone not a total overall like yours. So for for comparison finish your statement and tell the fastest speeding car driver. 2. I never mentioned "your" car, but I have seen that car involved and can say for definite that passenger would of ended up in hospital if the impact happened in the door not the wing. 3. Hate might have been a strong word but obviously think your better than motorcycle riders saying they have to earn your respect. 4. You think your a good driver, pretty close to perfect, what gives you the right to say that? 5. You and many have turned this story into anti-biker, anti-taxi driver. Why not just have respect for other road users and be aware of what's happening around you like asked?[/p][/quote]Apologies, clearly i have upset you, with MY opinions. If the passenger in that car was to be badly injured, clearly the biker was going to fast. I`m not anti biker, I`m not anti taxi driver, I`m anti law breaking driver ( bike or car ) Massive respect to other road users. all of them, truck, car, van and bike. Get off your high horse. i was simply stating the obvious. studio
  • Score: -2

1:33pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
I've done the work for you.... The fastest convicted speeder in the UK was Daniel Nicks, convicted of 175 mph (282 km/h) on a Honda Fireblade motorcycle in 2000. He received six weeks in jail and was banned from driving for two years. The fastest UK speeder in a car was Timothy Brady, caught driving a 3.6-litre Porsche 911 Turbo at 172 mph (277 km/h) on the A420 in Oxfordshire in January 2007 and jailed for 10 weeks and banned from driving for 3 years. So does 3mph make that biker and 99% of all bikers adrenalin junkies! and all car drivers not perfect, but pretty close and deserve the respect of bike riders?
Well done, top marks on your use of google.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: I've done the work for you.... The fastest convicted speeder in the UK was Daniel Nicks, convicted of 175 mph (282 km/h) on a Honda Fireblade motorcycle in 2000. He received six weeks in jail and was banned from driving for two years.[1] The fastest UK speeder in a car was Timothy Brady, caught driving a 3.6-litre Porsche 911 Turbo at 172 mph (277 km/h) on the A420 in Oxfordshire in January 2007 and jailed for 10 weeks and banned from driving for 3 years.[2] So does 3mph make that biker and 99% of all bikers adrenalin junkies! and all car drivers not perfect, but pretty close and deserve the respect of bike riders?[/p][/quote]Well done, top marks on your use of google. studio
  • Score: -2

2:37pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts.
If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police.
You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect.
I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better.
Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements.
You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts. If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police. You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect. I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better. Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements. Trada
  • Score: 2

3:07pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts. If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police. You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect. I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better. Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements.
"Everything i have said is wrong" I wasnt quoting any facts, simply my opinions.

I dont think i am better than anyone, certainly when i have never met them.

" She knows better " funny that, i stand to wee.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts. If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police. You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect. I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better. Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements.[/p][/quote]"Everything i have said is wrong" I wasnt quoting any facts, simply my opinions. I dont think i am better than anyone, certainly when i have never met them. " She knows better " funny that, i stand to wee. studio
  • Score: -1

3:10pm Thu 5 Jun 14

dham says...

So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact.
There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK.
Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54
Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist.
"Right of way violations
Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine
ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981)
The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments."
Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that
motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.
So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other [cars] as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of [mechanically separate] front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’. dham
  • Score: 6

3:22pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

studio wrote:
Trada wrote:
You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts. If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police. You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect. I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better. Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements.
"Everything i have said is wrong" I wasnt quoting any facts, simply my opinions.

I dont think i am better than anyone, certainly when i have never met them.

" She knows better " funny that, i stand to wee.
Well your opinions are wrong, we've proved that.
If your not better than anyone else why do they have to earn your respect? Most will probably never meet you and probably don't want to.
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: You haven't upset me I'm just trying to be objective. Everything you have said is either wrong or made up without facts. If that biker was speeding he would have been the one in court, he wasn't, as stated by witnesses and police. You are against bikers, you think you are better than them you said they have to earn your respect. I am not on a high horse I'm just trying to teach someone some facts who obviously thinks she knows better. Thanks for the compliment about using google to learn the facts, maybe you should do the same before making false statements.[/p][/quote]"Everything i have said is wrong" I wasnt quoting any facts, simply my opinions. I dont think i am better than anyone, certainly when i have never met them. " She knows better " funny that, i stand to wee.[/p][/quote]Well your opinions are wrong, we've proved that. If your not better than anyone else why do they have to earn your respect? Most will probably never meet you and probably don't want to. Trada
  • Score: 2

3:23pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

dham wrote:
So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.
Forgot to mention. I own a branson BH 125. which i drive most weeks.... Blows your comment out of the water a bit.
[quote][p][bold]dham[/bold] wrote: So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other [cars] as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of [mechanically separate] front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.[/p][/quote]Forgot to mention. I own a branson BH 125. which i drive most weeks.... Blows your comment out of the water a bit. studio
  • Score: 2

4:01pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Yemen says...

studio wrote:
dham wrote:
So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.
Forgot to mention. I own a branson BH 125. which i drive most weeks.... Blows your comment out of the water a bit.
no it blows yours out of the water.... you don't drive a scooter or a bike you ride it....

also very suspicious that you should bring this information to the table so late on in the conversation, almost as if your trying to gain brownie points to add weight to your absurd opinion by 'suddenly' realising you're biker.

Hoisted by your own petard i think.
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dham[/bold] wrote: So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other [cars] as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of [mechanically separate] front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.[/p][/quote]Forgot to mention. I own a branson BH 125. which i drive most weeks.... Blows your comment out of the water a bit.[/p][/quote]no it blows yours out of the water.... you don't drive a scooter or a bike you ride it.... also very suspicious that you should bring this information to the table so late on in the conversation, almost as if your trying to gain brownie points to add weight to your absurd opinion by 'suddenly' realising you're biker. Hoisted by your own petard i think. Yemen
  • Score: 4

4:05pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Yemen says...

oh and also Branson don't make a BH btw....

they do make a BM 125 but you would think anyone who owns a bike would know the model name ...

wouldn't you ?
oh and also Branson don't make a BH btw.... they do make a BM 125 but you would think anyone who owns a bike would know the model name ... wouldn't you ? Yemen
  • Score: 2

4:19pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

I never claimed to be a biker. Maybe thats why i made the mistake of BH and BM.

I simply enjoy "driving" my bike most weeks.

No Brownie points required here.
I never claimed to be a biker. Maybe thats why i made the mistake of BH and BM. I simply enjoy "driving" my bike most weeks. No Brownie points required here. studio
  • Score: -1

4:27pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue.
Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue. Trada
  • Score: -1

4:27pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue.
Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue. Trada
  • Score: -1

4:49pm Thu 5 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue.
I rest my case.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: Say no more dham and Yemen , think we would have success teaching a muppet to breath. This guy hasn't a clue.[/p][/quote]I rest my case. studio
  • Score: 0

5:23pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Trada says...

Your case proves one thing, your mentality is less than a muppet. Everyone that's commented on your posts has proved you wrong, you have even admitted some off your comments are not based on facts, you have contradicted yourself and now claim to ride a bike after slagging bikers. Your a joke.
The end.
Your case proves one thing, your mentality is less than a muppet. Everyone that's commented on your posts has proved you wrong, you have even admitted some off your comments are not based on facts, you have contradicted yourself and now claim to ride a bike after slagging bikers. Your a joke. The end. Trada
  • Score: -1

5:48pm Thu 5 Jun 14

dham says...

From Department of Transport Report. Number 54 . I have hundreds of similar references from Government reports
"The specific behaviours of other drivers given by the respondents included
motorists’ inattention, motorists changing lanes without looking properly, and motorists being distracted while in their vehicles by passengers, mobile phones, etc.‘No continuity of observation’ was the biggest cause of accidents in the database; that reason alone being the cause of over a third of all motorcycle accidents. Of these, the riders were only at fault in 10.9% of the accidents, whereas the other road users accounted for 77.1%."
From Department of Transport Report. Number 54 . I have hundreds of similar references from Government reports "The specific behaviours of other drivers given by the respondents included motorists’ inattention, motorists changing lanes without looking properly, and motorists being distracted while in their vehicles by passengers, mobile phones, etc.‘No continuity of observation’ was the biggest cause of accidents in the database; that reason alone being the cause of over a third of all motorcycle accidents. Of these, the riders were only at fault in 10.9% of the accidents, whereas the other road users accounted for 77.1%." dham
  • Score: 3

5:55pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The Sleeper says...

dham wrote:
So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact.
There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK.
Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54
Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist.
"Right of way violations
Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine

ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981)
The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments."
Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that
motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.
The reports you have researched no doubt includes the whole UK with its massive urban areas. The North Yorks report which does not include the city of York is very different. The vast majority of bikers in the county come here to ride in our beautiful countryside and as I said of the collisions over 70 percent show the bike rider at fault. You cannot get away from the facts. That in no way excuses car drivers for there errors. The problem is here that most people here are safe and careful drivers. The ones we should worry about are those car/bike users who we cannot educate and have no respect for others or the laws in this country. Respect to you all.
[quote][p][bold]dham[/bold] wrote: So much opinion from non bikers and so little researched fact. There are numerous researched and peer reviewed papers on this subject. The often quoted Yorkshire Police report is true for a particular area of North Yorks. It is like producing an accident report of the Isle of Man and then saying it refers to the entire UK. It would be not a fair summary for the whole of the UK. Department of Transport, In Depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents, Road Safety Research Report No.54 Where 2 vehicles are involved 56.9 (say 57)% it's the car drivers fault, and only 21% of 2 vehicle collisions can it be attributed to the motorcyclist, the remainder is made up of other factors not attributable to the motorcyclist. "Right of way violations Of the total cases, 681 (38%) involve ROWVs. However, less than 20% of these involve a motorcyclist who rated as either fully or partly to blame for the accident. The majority of motorcycle ROWV accidents have been found to be primarily the fault of other motorists. This is an even higher level of ‘non-blameworthine ss’ in ROWV accidents than that observed in other in- depth studies, e.g. Hurt et al. (1981) The majority of ROWVs occur at T-junctions, which are three times as common as roundabouts or crossroads. This finding is in accordance with the work of Hole, Tyrell and Langham (1996), who found that the majority of such accidents occurred at ‘uncontrolled’ (i.e. no stop light or sign with only give-way markings and/or signs present) T-junctions in urban environments." Mannering and Grodsky (1995) point out several reasons why the characteristics of motorcycle accidents differ from those of other vehicles. Firstly, they claim car drivers ‘tend to be inattentive with regard to motorcyclists and have conditioned themselves to look only for other [cars] as possible collision dangers’. Motorcyclists themselves often repeat anecdotal stories of the car driver’s ‘sorry I didn’t see you’ explanation for collisions. Secondly, Mannering and Grodsky (1995) also claim that motorcycle operation is typically a more complex task than car driving, requiring excellent motor skills, physical co-ordination and balance. Motorcycle riding can also involve counterintuitive skills, such as ‘counter-steering, simultaneous application of [mechanically separate] front and rear brakes, and opening the throttle while negotiating turns’.[/p][/quote]The reports you have researched no doubt includes the whole UK with its massive urban areas. The North Yorks report which does not include the city of York is very different. The vast majority of bikers in the county come here to ride in our beautiful countryside and as I said of the collisions over 70 percent show the bike rider at fault. You cannot get away from the facts. That in no way excuses car drivers for there errors. The problem is here that most people here are safe and careful drivers. The ones we should worry about are those car/bike users who we cannot educate and have no respect for others or the laws in this country. Respect to you all. The Sleeper
  • Score: 0

6:22pm Thu 5 Jun 14

DarloXman says...

Cycles, bikes, cars and trucks all have one thing in common - they're driven by people!

People are sadly prone to making mistakes.

If you're involved in an collision when in a HGV truck then there is a very good chance you will survive and escape with recoverable injuries. The odds in a car are just a little bit lower. Unfortunately if your involved in a collision when riding a motorbike or a cycle you are likely to be severely injured!

I personally would never ride a bike or motorbike on main or country roads ever again - the roods are just too dangerous and the odds are not in your favour!
Cycles, bikes, cars and trucks all have one thing in common - they're driven by people! People are sadly prone to making mistakes. If you're involved in an collision when in a HGV truck then there is a very good chance you will survive and escape with recoverable injuries. The odds in a car are just a little bit lower. Unfortunately if your involved in a collision when riding a motorbike or a cycle you are likely to be severely injured! I personally would never ride a bike or motorbike on main or country roads ever again - the roods are just too dangerous and the odds are not in your favour! DarloXman
  • Score: 0

8:51pm Thu 5 Jun 14

dham says...

As I stated the North Yorks report is a very special report for a tiny part of the UK as a whole. It can not be extrapolated to the whole UK.
The 70 % collisions you mention are not collisions with other vehicles they are actually single vehicle incidents that don't involve another party. ie going too fast on a bend. But you'd have to read the full unexpedited reports to find that out. Not the shock horror posters designed to catch the eye.
North Yorks does have a problem with inexperienced riders often on large bikes, yeap, no denying that. However, all validated and peer reviewed research says that the majority of bike collisions nationally are due to ROWV or shunts from behind. The bikes being hard to see myth is just that. As again proper research (start with DfT reports from 2000 up to the 2014 ones) shows that drivers do actually see bikes but fail to register them and act on the information their eyes are feeding their brains. Surprisingly younger drivers are more likely to see a bike and recognise the risk. Middle age and older drivers are the most likely to cause a ROWV and over a third of all national collisions are ROWV.
As I stated the North Yorks report is a very special report for a tiny part of the UK as a whole. It can not be extrapolated to the whole UK. The 70 % collisions you mention are not collisions with other vehicles they are actually single vehicle incidents that don't involve another party. ie going too fast on a bend. But you'd have to read the full unexpedited reports to find that out. Not the shock horror posters designed to catch the eye. North Yorks does have a problem with inexperienced riders often on large bikes, yeap, no denying that. However, all validated and peer reviewed research says that the majority of bike collisions nationally are due to ROWV or shunts from behind. The bikes being hard to see myth is just that. As again proper research (start with DfT reports from 2000 up to the 2014 ones) shows that drivers do actually see bikes but fail to register them and act on the information their eyes are feeding their brains. Surprisingly younger drivers are more likely to see a bike and recognise the risk. Middle age and older drivers are the most likely to cause a ROWV and over a third of all national collisions are ROWV. dham
  • Score: 1

9:00am Fri 6 Jun 14

studio says...

Trada wrote:
Your case proves one thing, your mentality is less than a muppet. Everyone that's commented on your posts has proved you wrong, you have even admitted some off your comments are not based on facts, you have contradicted yourself and now claim to ride a bike after slagging bikers. Your a joke. The end.
Thanks for your personal insults.

Comments are comments, simply that.

I must say again, You`re = you are.
[quote][p][bold]Trada[/bold] wrote: Your case proves one thing, your mentality is less than a muppet. Everyone that's commented on your posts has proved you wrong, you have even admitted some off your comments are not based on facts, you have contradicted yourself and now claim to ride a bike after slagging bikers. Your a joke. The end.[/p][/quote]Thanks for your personal insults. Comments are comments, simply that. I must say again, You`re = you are. studio
  • Score: 0

10:47am Fri 6 Jun 14

dham says...

Whoops, my last line should read; 'Over a third of collisions in North York's are ROWvs and shunts from behind and similar; Nationally ROWVs account for about 60% of PTW/car collisions.
Whoops, my last line should read; 'Over a third of collisions in North York's are ROWvs and shunts from behind and similar; Nationally ROWVs account for about 60% of PTW/car collisions. dham
  • Score: 0

9:50pm Fri 6 Jun 14

JSmithers says...

studio wrote:
I never claimed to be a biker. Maybe thats why i made the mistake of BH and BM.

I simply enjoy "driving" my bike most weeks.

No Brownie points required here.
hahahah busted colin
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: I never claimed to be a biker. Maybe thats why i made the mistake of BH and BM. I simply enjoy "driving" my bike most weeks. No Brownie points required here.[/p][/quote]hahahah busted colin JSmithers
  • Score: 4

9:18pm Sat 7 Jun 14

tomtopper says...

dham wrote:
As I stated the North Yorks report is a very special report for a tiny part of the UK as a whole. It can not be extrapolated to the whole UK.
The 70 % collisions you mention are not collisions with other vehicles they are actually single vehicle incidents that don't involve another party. ie going too fast on a bend. But you'd have to read the full unexpedited reports to find that out. Not the shock horror posters designed to catch the eye.
North Yorks does have a problem with inexperienced riders often on large bikes, yeap, no denying that. However, all validated and peer reviewed research says that the majority of bike collisions nationally are due to ROWV or shunts from behind. The bikes being hard to see myth is just that. As again proper research (start with DfT reports from 2000 up to the 2014 ones) shows that drivers do actually see bikes but fail to register them and act on the information their eyes are feeding their brains. Surprisingly younger drivers are more likely to see a bike and recognise the risk. Middle age and older drivers are the most likely to cause a ROWV and over a third of all national collisions are ROWV.
The problem with Motorcyclists and cyclists is that they can easily fall into a Humans visual blindspot ..

All to do with whats known as 'saccades' and 'fixations' .. The brain can block an image that is being received whilst the eyes are moving effectively 'jumping over' an image (saccadic masking)..

Ask any fighter pilot, they know all about this phenomenon..

Combine that with the detached comfort of modern vehicles and it can be very dangerous..

Bikers need to be defensive and well presented around other vehicles and at junctions etc.. I think very little is down to bikers being reckless.. It's car drivers being surprised and not looking correctly..

Bikers need to recognise that most car drivers are switched off and ride accordingly when in their sphere..
[quote][p][bold]dham[/bold] wrote: As I stated the North Yorks report is a very special report for a tiny part of the UK as a whole. It can not be extrapolated to the whole UK. The 70 % collisions you mention are not collisions with other vehicles they are actually single vehicle incidents that don't involve another party. ie going too fast on a bend. But you'd have to read the full unexpedited reports to find that out. Not the shock horror posters designed to catch the eye. North Yorks does have a problem with inexperienced riders often on large bikes, yeap, no denying that. However, all validated and peer reviewed research says that the majority of bike collisions nationally are due to ROWV or shunts from behind. The bikes being hard to see myth is just that. As again proper research (start with DfT reports from 2000 up to the 2014 ones) shows that drivers do actually see bikes but fail to register them and act on the information their eyes are feeding their brains. Surprisingly younger drivers are more likely to see a bike and recognise the risk. Middle age and older drivers are the most likely to cause a ROWV and over a third of all national collisions are ROWV.[/p][/quote]The problem with Motorcyclists and cyclists is that they can easily fall into a Humans visual blindspot .. All to do with whats known as 'saccades' and 'fixations' .. The brain can block an image that is being received whilst the eyes are moving effectively 'jumping over' an image (saccadic masking).. Ask any fighter pilot, they know all about this phenomenon.. Combine that with the detached comfort of modern vehicles and it can be very dangerous.. Bikers need to be defensive and well presented around other vehicles and at junctions etc.. I think very little is down to bikers being reckless.. It's car drivers being surprised and not looking correctly.. Bikers need to recognise that most car drivers are switched off and ride accordingly when in their sphere.. tomtopper
  • Score: 0

9:57pm Sat 7 Jun 14

theWorkerScum says...

I'd say people just drive carelessly these days and a lot don't understand the rules of the road. The amount of times people pull out in front of me from a junction, or use the wrong lane in a roundabout. Happens DAILY. I love motorbikes but gave up mine because of too many idiots who can't even drive on one half of the road. Usually takes a crash to make you give it up. Just look at half the comments on here, most people don't give a s**t. If you can't see a motorbike (which does have lights on automatically) with a rider in full colourful leathers and an object underneath them you shouldn't be driving.
I'd say people just drive carelessly these days and a lot don't understand the rules of the road. The amount of times people pull out in front of me from a junction, or use the wrong lane in a roundabout. Happens DAILY. I love motorbikes but gave up mine because of too many idiots who can't even drive on one half of the road. Usually takes a crash to make you give it up. Just look at half the comments on here, most people don't give a s**t. If you can't see a motorbike (which does have lights on automatically) with a rider in full colourful leathers and an object underneath them you shouldn't be driving. theWorkerScum
  • Score: 0

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