Dog-bite injuries linked to deprivation, survey says

Darlington and Stockton Times: BITING BACK: Parts of the North-East have been named dog-bite injury blackspots BITING BACK: Parts of the North-East have been named dog-bite injury blackspots

THE North-East has some of the country's highest hospital admission rates for dog bites, according to a survey.

Figures released by healthcare data source the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) showed dog bites were more of a problem in deprived areas.

Some poorer areas saw three times more hospital admissions from dog bites than more affluent parts.

In the 12 months to January this year, the rate for hospital admissions for dog bites for people living in the most deprived areas was 24.1 per 100,000 - 1,240 admissions.

There were just 428 admissions in the least deprived areas, or 8.1 per 100,000 people.

Durham, Darlington and Teesside - with 269 cases, or almost 23 admissions per 100,000 - had the second highest rate of admissions behind Merseyside.

There was also an increase in hospital admissions caused by dogs and other animals, including horses, foxes and cats.

Cumbria, Northumberland and Tyne and Wear recorded 388 dog-bite admissions – 20.1 per 100,000 - and 151 resulting from other animals.

North Yorkshire’s figures were merged with Humberside, with a total of 273 dog-bite admissions – 16.4 per 100,000 – and 139 from other animals.

The 12 months to January saw a total of 9,710 hospital admissions as a result of dog bites, an increase of seven per cent on the previous year.

Admissions were highest during the summer, with young children the most affected age group.

HSCIC chairman Kingsley Manning said: “Today’s report shows hospital admissions for bites and strikes by dogs are three times as high in the most deprived areas of England as in the least deprived areas.

“As we head towards the summer, when admission rates for dog bites are at their highest, these trends may be worth further study by healthcare organisations and public sector bodies.”

Kennel Club secretary Caroline Kisko added: “These incidents, whether it be a child falling over the family pet and injuring themselves, or a child being nipped by an unfamiliar dog, are alarming and are particularly high in the North-East, but they are also largely avoidable with the right precautions.

“Dogs are a huge part of our lives in Britain and children are naturally curious and excited around them, so it is crucial that they are taught from an early age how best to interact with them.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:28pm Thu 24 Apr 14

LUSTARD says...

are thier more flies and midges in poorer areas or more in rich areas , i know some big wealthy estates that have some very fierce dogs that are really well fed but will still tear you to pieces,,
are thier more flies and midges in poorer areas or more in rich areas , i know some big wealthy estates that have some very fierce dogs that are really well fed but will still tear you to pieces,, LUSTARD
  • Score: 10

8:42pm Thu 24 Apr 14

Homshaw1 says...

People do seem to be attracted to more aggressive breeds and don,t look after them properly
People do seem to be attracted to more aggressive breeds and don,t look after them properly Homshaw1
  • Score: 15

10:26pm Thu 24 Apr 14

bambara says...

Moron dogs do seem to be very popular these days.
That is agressive pit-bull type dogs, with the moron being at the other end of the lead.
From what I have seen the morons are mostly owned by inadequate little men without the brains to understand the difference between respect and revulsion.
Violent scum with dogs that have a higher IQ than the owners.
The result is only to be expected.
Moron dogs do seem to be very popular these days. That is agressive pit-bull type dogs, with the moron being at the other end of the lead. From what I have seen the morons are mostly owned by inadequate little men without the brains to understand the difference between respect and revulsion. Violent scum with dogs that have a higher IQ than the owners. The result is only to be expected. bambara
  • Score: 15

12:19am Fri 25 Apr 14

stevegg says...

Aggressive dogs are seen by mainly unemployed males as a status symbol and are trained to be aggressive. Makes me wonder how they afford on public taxpayers money which they have the cheek to call their 'wages'!
Aggressive dogs are seen by mainly unemployed males as a status symbol and are trained to be aggressive. Makes me wonder how they afford on public taxpayers money which they have the cheek to call their 'wages'! stevegg
  • Score: 14

8:27am Fri 25 Apr 14

Homshaw1 says...

I did have a friend whose girlfriend had a poodle. Someone broke into her house stole jewellry laptop and a poodle. They caught those responsible but the poodle was thought to have been used to get other dogs used to killing.

Sick
I did have a friend whose girlfriend had a poodle. Someone broke into her house stole jewellry laptop and a poodle. They caught those responsible but the poodle was thought to have been used to get other dogs used to killing. Sick Homshaw1
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree