Teesdale hoteliers host anniversary competition for local artists

Darlington and Stockton Times: Peter Philips and Barbara-Anne Johnson, who are celebrating their 20th anniversary of owning The Morritt Hotel, in Greta Bridge Peter Philips and Barbara-Anne Johnson, who are celebrating their 20th anniversary of owning The Morritt Hotel, in Greta Bridge

ARTISTS and sculptors are being sought to create a piece of artwork inspired by part of the North-East countryside.

Creative competitors, who live within 20-miles of the Morritt Hotel, in Greta Bridge, County Durham, are invited to vie for a £1,500 commission to celebrate the owners’ 20th anniversary at the establishment.

Entitled “The Spirit of Teesdale”, the winning artwork will be displayed either inside the hotel or its grounds.

Barbara-Anne Johnson, who owns The Morritt with her husband Peter Philips, said: ”We wanted to do something special to celebrate being at the hotel since 1994 and thought a permanent artwork would be perfect.

“The Morritt has come a long way in the past 20 years and we have worked very hard.

“We’re a family-run hotel set in beautiful Teesdale countryside so we want something that encapsulates what this area is all about and celebrates local people and artists.

“It’s an exciting brief that artists can interpret as they see fit and really let their imagination run wild.

“The new artwork will be a great feature displayed at the hotel for many years to come.”

The competition is open to professionals and amateurs and can be any permanent format or material.

Entrants should submit a written proposal of the artwork, with preliminary sketches if available, and images of previous work.

To enter, email relax@themorritt.co.uk, including names, addresses and contact details.

The closing date for entries is Thursday, May 8.

The winning commission will be selected by Monday, May 26 and the completed piece should be delivered by Tuesday, July 1.

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:59pm Wed 9 Apr 14

Nicholas_Till says...

I suspect the spirit of Teesdale is actually a mischievous goblin that lives in the place's eldritch weather.

A few years ago there was a plan to promote County Durham as a place where visitors might find plentiful peace and quiet, well away from the crowds. Fair enough. It's there. But it comes with extras.

A group of Taekwondo enthusiasts was accordingly commissioned for a publicity film. They were taken onto Widdybank Fell in Upper Teesdale, the idea being that they should extend themselves in graceful movements expressive of the unruffled communion with nature that visitors might be happy to enjoy, silhouetted against the sky and bits of local tundra.

A vile cold squall promptly assailed them, and they had to drop their activity and dash to the minibus pretty fast to escape getting sodden and hypothermic. I don't know if this experiment was ever repeated, or what time of year it was. Wouldn't be surprised if it was summer.

That's why the North Pennines offers so much unfrequented space to a walker, e.g., who likes this. You have to be slightly mad to take on the wind and weather that goes with it.

Lovely place, when you can see it!
I suspect the spirit of Teesdale is actually a mischievous goblin that lives in the place's eldritch weather. A few years ago there was a plan to promote County Durham as a place where visitors might find plentiful peace and quiet, well away from the crowds. Fair enough. It's there. But it comes with extras. A group of Taekwondo enthusiasts was accordingly commissioned for a publicity film. They were taken onto Widdybank Fell in Upper Teesdale, the idea being that they should extend themselves in graceful movements expressive of the unruffled communion with nature that visitors might be happy to enjoy, silhouetted against the sky and bits of local tundra. A vile cold squall promptly assailed them, and they had to drop their activity and dash to the minibus pretty fast to escape getting sodden and hypothermic. I don't know if this experiment was ever repeated, or what time of year it was. Wouldn't be surprised if it was summer. That's why the North Pennines offers so much unfrequented space to a walker, e.g., who likes this. You have to be slightly mad to take on the wind and weather that goes with it. Lovely place, when you can see it! Nicholas_Till
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree