Injured kayaker rescued from swollen River Swale

Darlington and Stockton Times: KAYAKER RESCUE: The rescue took place near Keld, in Swaledale KAYAKER RESCUE: The rescue took place near Keld, in Swaledale

AN injured kayaker was pulled from a swollen river by rescuers on Sunday evening.

About 20 volunteers from Swaledale Mountain Rescue Team (SMRT) and a similar number of firefighters were involved in the rescue of a man from the River Swale at Catrake Force near Keld, in Swaledale.

Rescuers were called to the scene at about 5.40pm on Sunday evening.

Steve Clough, from SMRT, said: “He was stuck in his kayak in the river because he had hurt his back.

“He was under a waterfall and we had to haul him up a crag of about ten metres on a stretcher.

“It was not the easiest of rescues. Conditions were very poor - it was hailing and sleeting."

The man was taken to hospital by ambulance with non-life threatening injuries.

Four uninjured kayakers were given assistance at the scene by rescuers.

  • If you know the man who was rescued, call our newsdesk on 01325 505068.

Comments (9)

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9:42pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Ian James says...

All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.
All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me. Ian James
  • Score: -29

12:10am Mon 10 Feb 14

dd1111 says...

Ian James wrote:
All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.
Nobody did ask you. You have a very sad way of looking at things. Do you drive? If your ever in an accident wonder if anyone would risk their lives for your disrespectful idiotic self.
[quote][p][bold]Ian James[/bold] wrote: All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.[/p][/quote]Nobody did ask you. You have a very sad way of looking at things. Do you drive? If your ever in an accident wonder if anyone would risk their lives for your disrespectful idiotic self. dd1111
  • Score: 4

12:28am Mon 10 Feb 14

Bahhhhhh says...

Ian my friend, given the choice to pay a voluntary contribution for 1 kayaker now and then than all the taxes for the drunk idiots killing and injuring people and themselves every weekend, I know what I'd be doing! Do you ride a bike, run or play football or even stumble your way home after the pub? Maybe you should find something in your life rather than complain of others enjoying it!
I don't wish hurt on you but god forgive if you get in accident I'd love it if a kayaker came to your aid with an advanced knowledge of rescue / first aid training and pulled you out the crap!
Ian my friend, given the choice to pay a voluntary contribution for 1 kayaker now and then than all the taxes for the drunk idiots killing and injuring people and themselves every weekend, I know what I'd be doing! Do you ride a bike, run or play football or even stumble your way home after the pub? Maybe you should find something in your life rather than complain of others enjoying it! I don't wish hurt on you but god forgive if you get in accident I'd love it if a kayaker came to your aid with an advanced knowledge of rescue / first aid training and pulled you out the crap! Bahhhhhh
  • Score: 5

6:13am Mon 10 Feb 14

Ian James says...

Get yerselves out in your kayaks lads, you need a dip n cool down by the sound of it, I do love the comments tho, nice 1!! lol.
Get yerselves out in your kayaks lads, you need a dip n cool down by the sound of it, I do love the comments tho, nice 1!! lol. Ian James
  • Score: 4

11:12am Mon 10 Feb 14

Colcat says...

It was Lower Kisdon, not Catrake Force.
It was Lower Kisdon, not Catrake Force. Colcat
  • Score: 0

6:16pm Mon 10 Feb 14

Joe Willis says...

Colcat wrote:
It was Lower Kisdon, not Catrake Force.
Apologies. I was told Catrake by SMRT on Sunday.
[quote][p][bold]Colcat[/bold] wrote: It was Lower Kisdon, not Catrake Force.[/p][/quote]Apologies. I was told Catrake by SMRT on Sunday. Joe Willis
  • Score: 0

8:52pm Mon 10 Feb 14

grandmab says...

Lucky for this guy he lives in England. In many countries he would have been charged the full price of the rescue. Don't go to the USA without good insurance because if you have to be rescued it will cost thousands and many insurance companies won't cover you for extreme sports. Glad he only had minor injuries.
Lucky for this guy he lives in England. In many countries he would have been charged the full price of the rescue. Don't go to the USA without good insurance because if you have to be rescued it will cost thousands and many insurance companies won't cover you for extreme sports. Glad he only had minor injuries. grandmab
  • Score: 1

10:16pm Tue 11 Feb 14

Will Mostyn says...

Ian James wrote:
All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.
Ive been kayaking since i was 7, 21 now And a Keen Kayaker and indeed a Coach. Their is no better feeling in the world than the Buzz of Kayaking on a Massive River and a swollen River etc with the Danger. All other Kayakers will know what I mean. We choose to put ourselves in this Position. The Paddlers that go on the Big rivers will all be very good and will all know what they are doing. Yes It does go tits up Just like in any Adventurous Sport, Any Main stream Sport or in Real life in general. I don't want or expect anyone to get themselves into Danger to rescue me. But Ian in whatever sport or Activity or just in general if you get hurt or something goes wrong would you not want the Emergency Services to rescue you?? Or if a Family or friend got hurt? As your not A Kayaker or indeed a Canoeist i dont think its fair judging others
[quote][p][bold]Ian James[/bold] wrote: All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.[/p][/quote]Ive been kayaking since i was 7, 21 now And a Keen Kayaker and indeed a Coach. Their is no better feeling in the world than the Buzz of Kayaking on a Massive River and a swollen River etc with the Danger. All other Kayakers will know what I mean. We choose to put ourselves in this Position. The Paddlers that go on the Big rivers will all be very good and will all know what they are doing. Yes It does go tits up Just like in any Adventurous Sport, Any Main stream Sport or in Real life in general. I don't want or expect anyone to get themselves into Danger to rescue me. But Ian in whatever sport or Activity or just in general if you get hurt or something goes wrong would you not want the Emergency Services to rescue you?? Or if a Family or friend got hurt? As your not A Kayaker or indeed a Canoeist i dont think its fair judging others Will Mostyn
  • Score: 0

2:24pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Colcat says...

Ian James wrote:
All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.
As I posted (but with some editing) on the article telling of the rescue and of his injuries:

The river was NOT "swollen" (as described in the article and by Ian James). At the time of the incident the Swale was measured at 0.87m, which is considered a "medium" level by paddlers. This is yet again glorification to make the situation seem worse than it was by the reporter, who should have done at least some research into how kayakers perceive it, rather than assuming that a) it was raining, and b) there was an incident, therefore c) the river must have been swollen! As anyone who has much experience in paddling would know, safety is always a very high priority, with difficult rapids being inspected and normally having safety set up, with people at suitable positions with throwlines, paddles to reach swimmers, and a knowledge of how to use the equipment they have. The majority of whitewater paddlers will pay for themselves to go on at least a basic safety course run by a qualified professional coach at a level determined by the British Canoe Union, many going on advanced courses or sharing and practising knowledge picked up on these courses. I myself have stowed in my kayak: a 20m throwline, a 16ft sling, several karabiners, a group shelter for 6-8 people, some spare clothing, a torch, a drink, my mobile phone in a solid drybox, a first aid kit (and I know how to use it): and on my person (in my buoyancy aid - we don't wear life-jackets, and for a good reason!): a knife, whistle, chocolate, and a couple of pulleys, more karabiners; round my neck are dogtags with my personal details, NHS number, allergy info and ICE contact info. It is not unusual for most paddlers to carry similar items, normally spread amongst the group. To suggest that Jack (or most paddlers) did not/do not risk assess the situation is to fall foul of reporting that likes to give the impression that people such as Jack Gunter and all the other outdoor enthusiasts or people who partake in what some like to call them "extreme" (hate that term) sports. Remember that 'non-incident' back in 2008 in the Lake District, when a mountain marathon was called off after 3 hours due to extreme weather, and the media had a field day, yet NOT ONE SINGLE PERSON of the 2,500 entrants needed to be rescued!?! Still idiotic comments were made at the time.

To the outside observer, yes kayaking, canoeing, rock climbing, mountaineering etc seem to be dangerous, and they take place in what can be dangerous environments, but when done properly the risks are minimised to a great extent. Yes, accidents can and do happen, as is the case here, and yes, participants sometimes lose their lives, as one did on Sunday on the River Usk in Wales, but these events are rare because participants take their own and each other's safety very seriously. Jack Gunter is a TEAM GB kayaker, so is very competent, and was operating within his abilities. Unfortunately, sometimes, accident do just happen.

Maybe Mr Gunter should stick to safe sports like table tennis, rugby, swimming, cycling, running, football, tennis, horse riding, American football? Yet all of these sports have a higher fatality rate (percentage per number of participants, not just a higher basic number) than canoeing/kayaking. In fact, something like six times as many people drown in cars than in canoes/kayaks! The most dangerous part of a trip is the journey there and back! (And incidentally, the nearest I ever came to drowning was one time at the Tees Barrage White Water Course, in a so-called 'safe' environment!)
[quote][p][bold]Ian James[/bold] wrote: All these kayakers that go out onto swollen and dangerous rivers in the Winter are all light as kites I think and they deserve everything they get. Because who in their right mind, would decide to go out in a bit of plastic and think they can control major fast flowing n flooded rivers with a plastic stick and a crash helmet and in freezing cold water n conditions are proper divvies. And, when it all of a sudden goes tits up and its no surprise that it does, they expect other people to risk their lives n go in and save them. And, if they are lucky enough to be saved and are injury free, as soon as their okay again, they go right back in and do it all over again, an absolute load of loons if you ask me.[/p][/quote]As I posted (but with some editing) on the article telling of the rescue and of his injuries: The river was NOT "swollen" (as described in the article and by Ian James). At the time of the incident the Swale was measured at 0.87m, which is considered a "medium" level by paddlers. This is yet again glorification to make the situation seem worse than it was by the reporter, who should have done at least some research into how kayakers perceive it, rather than assuming that a) it was raining, and b) there was an incident, therefore c) the river must have been swollen! As anyone who has much experience in paddling would know, safety is always a very high priority, with difficult rapids being inspected and normally having safety set up, with people at suitable positions with throwlines, paddles to reach swimmers, and a knowledge of how to use the equipment they have. The majority of whitewater paddlers will pay for themselves to go on at least a basic safety course run by a qualified professional coach at a level determined by the British Canoe Union, many going on advanced courses or sharing and practising knowledge picked up on these courses. I myself have stowed in my kayak: a 20m throwline, a 16ft sling, several karabiners, a group shelter for 6-8 people, some spare clothing, a torch, a drink, my mobile phone in a solid drybox, a first aid kit (and I know how to use it): and on my person (in my buoyancy aid - we don't wear life-jackets, and for a good reason!): a knife, whistle, chocolate, and a couple of pulleys, more karabiners; round my neck are dogtags with my personal details, NHS number, allergy info and ICE contact info. It is not unusual for most paddlers to carry similar items, normally spread amongst the group. To suggest that Jack (or most paddlers) did not/do not risk assess the situation is to fall foul of reporting that likes to give the impression that people such as Jack Gunter and all the other outdoor enthusiasts or people who partake in what some like to call them "extreme" (hate that term) sports. Remember that 'non-incident' back in 2008 in the Lake District, when a mountain marathon was called off after 3 hours due to extreme weather, and the media had a field day, yet NOT ONE SINGLE PERSON of the 2,500 entrants needed to be rescued!?! Still idiotic comments were made at the time. To the outside observer, yes kayaking, canoeing, rock climbing, mountaineering etc seem to be dangerous, and they take place in what can be dangerous environments, but when done properly the risks are minimised to a great extent. Yes, accidents can and do happen, as is the case here, and yes, participants sometimes lose their lives, as one did on Sunday on the River Usk in Wales, but these events are rare because participants take their own and each other's safety very seriously. Jack Gunter is a TEAM GB kayaker, so is very competent, and was operating within his abilities. Unfortunately, sometimes, accident do just happen. Maybe Mr Gunter should stick to safe sports like table tennis, rugby, swimming, cycling, running, football, tennis, horse riding, American football? Yet all of these sports have a higher fatality rate (percentage per number of participants, not just a higher basic number) than canoeing/kayaking. In fact, something like six times as many people drown in cars than in canoes/kayaks! The most dangerous part of a trip is the journey there and back! (And incidentally, the nearest I ever came to drowning was one time at the Tees Barrage White Water Course, in a so-called 'safe' environment!) Colcat
  • Score: 0

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