Mobility scooter trainer's concern over rise in accidents

Darlington and Stockton Times: Dan Hillerby of Northallerton Shopmobility is calling for greater testing and regulation of mobility scooters. Dan Hillerby of Northallerton Shopmobility is calling for greater testing and regulation of mobility scooters.

A MOBILITY scooter trainer has backed calls for tests to determine who should be allowed to use them, following the death of one of his customers in a road accident.

Dan Hillerby, managing director of One Care Mobility, in Northallerton, said politicians should press for legislation to ensure scooter users are both physically fit enough and sufficiently able to control the machines.

Mr Hillerby, who has worked with mobility scooter clients across County Durham, Teesside and North Yorkshire for 11 years, said he agreed with North Yorkshire coroner Michael Oakley that the Government should regulate the industry.

The inquest of Mr Hillerby’s customer Ron Archbold, 85, of Bedale, this week, heard how the pensioner had serious sight problems when his scooter “bolted out” in front of a car in the town.

Mr Hillerby said: “I do raise concerns with our customers’ families and refuse to sell scooters to people when we don’t feel they are capable.

“The number of accidents is increasing. We are getting one repair a week, whether it is a minor accident, crashing off kerbs, being hit by a car, driving into things or other damage.”

He said when he conducts scooter training sessions at nursing homes he is often frustrated by low uptakes and it had become clear some users’ knowledge of the separate code for driving on pavements was lacking.

He said: “We are finding people are not aware of some of the most basic rules, such as the 4mph speed limit on pavements.”

Following the inquest, coroner Michael Oakley said he would write to the Government calling for regulations over who could ride the scooters.

Mr Hillerby said he had become increasingly concerned anybody could sell scooters and that many unsuitable vehicles were being sold over the internet, where his firm insists on conducting suitability tests with its customers.

He also suggested scooter users should be given 12-month licences, which could be renewed following a medical check-up by GPs.

A Department of Transport spokesman said it would limit a forthcoming mobility scooter trial scheme to testing users’ eyes and had no plans to regulate sales of the vehicles.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:55pm Wed 27 Feb 13

hemmi1 says...

Idont mind seeing scooty users on the road thats what they are for maybe the selling dealer should hold some responcibility for user of the vehicle what i dont like is getting a scooty up my jacksie when in a shop
I have no problem with electric wheelchair users in shops as these people cant walk but scooty users can walk but get too lazy to park them outside
Idont mind seeing scooty users on the road thats what they are for maybe the selling dealer should hold some responcibility for user of the vehicle what i dont like is getting a scooty up my jacksie when in a shop I have no problem with electric wheelchair users in shops as these people cant walk but scooty users can walk but get too lazy to park them outside hemmi1
  • Score: 0

9:55pm Wed 27 Feb 13

Jolly Roger says...

A simply question should be how many scooters are on the streets and how many are involved in accidents.

Also if these people have to have a test so should eddle cyclists also as they are a danger to us pedestrians who are going blind.

It cuts both ways.
A simply question should be how many scooters are on the streets and how many are involved in accidents. Also if these people have to have a test so should eddle cyclists also as they are a danger to us pedestrians who are going blind. It cuts both ways. Jolly Roger
  • Score: 2

10:00am Thu 28 Feb 13

one care mobility says...

hemmi1 wrote:
Idont mind seeing scooty users on the road thats what they are for maybe the selling dealer should hold some responcibility for user of the vehicle what i dont like is getting a scooty up my jacksie when in a shop
I have no problem with electric wheelchair users in shops as these people cant walk but scooty users can walk but get too lazy to park them outside
As mobility scooter dealers we do have responsibilities to the end user. that is why we carry out assessments with every single one we sell. But one the person has passed an assessment it is down to that person to to ensure that if their condition or eye sight should deteriorate they take the responsible action. I don not have the authority to tell people that have had a scooter for some time to stop driving it. Just the same as owning a car. Which is far more dangerous
I will quite happily re assess anyone who feels they need it.
01609 781 333
[quote][p][bold]hemmi1[/bold] wrote: Idont mind seeing scooty users on the road thats what they are for maybe the selling dealer should hold some responcibility for user of the vehicle what i dont like is getting a scooty up my jacksie when in a shop I have no problem with electric wheelchair users in shops as these people cant walk but scooty users can walk but get too lazy to park them outside[/p][/quote]As mobility scooter dealers we do have responsibilities to the end user. that is why we carry out assessments with every single one we sell. But one the person has passed an assessment it is down to that person to to ensure that if their condition or eye sight should deteriorate they take the responsible action. I don not have the authority to tell people that have had a scooter for some time to stop driving it. Just the same as owning a car. Which is far more dangerous I will quite happily re assess anyone who feels they need it. 01609 781 333 one care mobility
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree