Roads closed by scores of accidents

EMERGENCY services across the region are at full stretch tonight dealing with scores of accidents on snow-covered roads.

At 7pm, 82 separate collisions had been reported to North Yorkshire Police.

The A19 southbound was closed at Ellerbeck, near Northallerton by a crash involving two lorries at 6.46pm.

No-one was hurt in the incident, but a large diesel spillage has to be cleared before the road can be reopened.

In County Durham, the A66 westbound was closed when a car hit a road sign near Sadberge, Darlington, shortly after 6pm.

A woman was cut from the car by fire fighters and taken to Darlington Memorial Hospital.

Elsewhere, two men were taken to James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough after a two-vehicle crash on the A181 at Wheatley Hill at 7.25pm.

Further north, four people were hurt in two collisions involving ten vehicles on the A19.

The emergency services were called to reports of a crash involving six vehicles on the slip road to the A690, near Houghton-le-Spring, at 6.23pm.

A short time later there was a further collision involving four vehicles on the same road.

The road is closed, and motorists are being diverted away from the area.

A spokeswoman for Northumbria Police said four people suffered minor injuries, and warned drivers take extra care in the snowy and icy conditions.

Comments (5)

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10:33pm Wed 13 Feb 13

chrisby33 says...

why were the two men taken to James Cook???

The ambulances will have driven past North Tees... or made the shorter trip to North Durham?
why were the two men taken to James Cook??? The ambulances will have driven past North Tees... or made the shorter trip to North Durham? chrisby33
  • Score: 0

11:29am Thu 14 Feb 13

Northern Paramedic says...

Its a question many in the NHS have been asking. Why are all patients driving past local A&E's and taking patients to James Cook who are always full?

Why do the air ambulances fly from Durham to James Cook instead of taking patients to Durham or RVI?

Could it be something to do with money and patient figures? Patients are worth money to hospitals. They generate money through a Coding system.

Its not about care, its about money and some in the ambulance service are doing deals with some in the NHS.

The Echo should ask the question - Who decides which hospital gets the patient, especially if the ambulance drives an extra 20 miles?
Its a question many in the NHS have been asking. Why are all patients driving past local A&E's and taking patients to James Cook who are always full? Why do the air ambulances fly from Durham to James Cook instead of taking patients to Durham or RVI? Could it be something to do with money and patient figures? Patients are worth money to hospitals. They generate money through a Coding system. Its not about care, its about money and some in the ambulance service are doing deals with some in the NHS. The Echo should ask the question - Who decides which hospital gets the patient, especially if the ambulance drives an extra 20 miles? Northern Paramedic
  • Score: 0

11:31am Thu 14 Feb 13

Northern Paramedic says...

If the Ambulance service wont tell the Echo the amswer maybe the MP's can find out?
If the Ambulance service wont tell the Echo the amswer maybe the MP's can find out? Northern Paramedic
  • Score: 0

12:26pm Thu 14 Feb 13

Yemen says...

chrisby33 wrote:
why were the two men taken to James Cook???

The ambulances will have driven past North Tees... or made the shorter trip to North Durham?
james cook is far better equipped to deal with head injuries, maybe that was an issue.
[quote][p][bold]chrisby33[/bold] wrote: why were the two men taken to James Cook??? The ambulances will have driven past North Tees... or made the shorter trip to North Durham?[/p][/quote]james cook is far better equipped to deal with head injuries, maybe that was an issue. Yemen
  • Score: 0

10:21pm Thu 14 Feb 13

bishopboy says...

There is a trauma bypass protocol in place, this means that certain injuries can go direct to j.c.u.h. or to the r.v.i. As they are both major trauma centres. As for who decides where the patient goes, this decision is made by the trauma centre after direct discussion with the ambulance crew and is based on optimal care not finance.
Ask yourself this, if you were involved in an accident and suffered major trauma where would you want to go, the local d.g.h. Which would probably mean a transfer out later if you survived or to somewhere that has all facilities in one place.
There is a trauma bypass protocol in place, this means that certain injuries can go direct to j.c.u.h. or to the r.v.i. As they are both major trauma centres. As for who decides where the patient goes, this decision is made by the trauma centre after direct discussion with the ambulance crew and is based on optimal care not finance. Ask yourself this, if you were involved in an accident and suffered major trauma where would you want to go, the local d.g.h. Which would probably mean a transfer out later if you survived or to somewhere that has all facilities in one place. bishopboy
  • Score: 1

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