Former Redcar woman sentenced to death over Bali drug smuggling

Lindsay Sandiford

Lindsay Sandiford

First published in News
Last updated
Darlington and Stockton Times: Photograph of the Author by , Deputy News Editor

A former North-East woman has this morning been sentenced to death after she was caught smuggling £1.6m worth of cocaine onto the Indonesian holiday island of Bali.

Lindsay Sandiford, 56, who is originally from Redcar, east Cleveland, was found with 4.8kg of the drug in the lining of her suitcase by police in May during a routine customs check.

Prosecutors had recommended that she be jailed instead after Sandiford, from Gloucestershire, agreed to take part in a 'sting' operation which led to the arrests of another British woman, two British men and an Indian.

The housewife also claimed that she only agreed to traffick the drug because the lives of her sons in England were being threatened.

Her defence lawyers said that Sandiford had a history of mental health problems which made her a vulnerable target for criminal gangs.

Indonesian police said that those arrested were part of a major international drugs network.

She was caught after arriving on a flight from Bangkok, Thailand.

Despite the sentencing recommendation, judges found that Sandiford had damaged Bali's image as a tourist destination and had weakened the Indonesian's strict anti-drugs programme.

They added that there were no mitigating circumstances which would persuade them to reduce their sentence.

A spokeswoman for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office said; "We can confirm that a British national is facing the death penalty in Indonesia.

"We remain in close contact with that national and continue to provide consular assistance."

Sandiford's lawyers said that they will appeal - arguing that it was most unusual that the judges would over rule the prosecutor's recommended sentence of 15 years in jail.

Last year, Paul Beales was jailed for four years for possession of drugs and Rachel Dougall was jailed for one year for failing to report a crime.

The trial of Brighton man Julian Ponder - believed to be Dougall's partner - for drugs possession is ongoing. Prosecutors allege that he collected cocaine from Sandiford.

 


 

 

 

 

Comments (8)

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9:10am Tue 22 Jan 13

mark.wilkinson says...

Ahhhh diddums.

We should treat all drug smugglers and dealers like this.
Ahhhh diddums. We should treat all drug smugglers and dealers like this. mark.wilkinson
  • Score: 0

9:26am Tue 22 Jan 13

stevegg says...

Same old sob stories trotted out, only difference is no one over there cares! If our legal system were run in a similar fashion where offenders are publicly humiliated and given harsh sentances in tough regime prisons then I'm pretty sure we wouldnt have the revolving door repeat offenders we have now and there would be a sharp fall in crime. They put the offenders rights exactly where they belong - nowhere in sight!
Same old sob stories trotted out, only difference is no one over there cares! If our legal system were run in a similar fashion where offenders are publicly humiliated and given harsh sentances in tough regime prisons then I'm pretty sure we wouldnt have the revolving door repeat offenders we have now and there would be a sharp fall in crime. They put the offenders rights exactly where they belong - nowhere in sight! stevegg
  • Score: 0

10:54am Tue 22 Jan 13

Davy Crocket says...

Once again the foot soldiers get punished whilst the King Pins get away scott free. She should be made to name those who forced her to traffic the drugs.
Once again the foot soldiers get punished whilst the King Pins get away scott free. She should be made to name those who forced her to traffic the drugs. Davy Crocket
  • Score: 0

11:27am Tue 22 Jan 13

behonest says...

They won't execute her, no way. The British government will tell the Bali authorities that they cannot do it and Bali will do as they are told.
They won't execute her, no way. The British government will tell the Bali authorities that they cannot do it and Bali will do as they are told. behonest
  • Score: 0

1:30pm Tue 22 Jan 13

BMD says...

behonest wrote:
They won't execute her, no way. The British government will tell the Bali authorities that they cannot do it and Bali will do as they are told.
I agree, but she may plead for the firing squad if she is given 15 years in an Indonesian jail.
[quote][p][bold]behonest[/bold] wrote: They won't execute her, no way. The British government will tell the Bali authorities that they cannot do it and Bali will do as they are told.[/p][/quote]I agree, but she may plead for the firing squad if she is given 15 years in an Indonesian jail. BMD
  • Score: 0

2:30pm Tue 22 Jan 13

MadammGeeky says...

The Indonesian judicial system is Jurassic.

HERE: www.expendable.tv/20
11/10/bali-trial.htm
l

See how evidence was simply an inconvenience in the Schapelle Corby's case? See what they did to her for refusing a false confession to a crime she didn't commit?

If you resist the bribes, and plead innocence, they crucify you. There is no concept of 'trial' there. None at all.

The police determine the verdict. For example, the so-called "judge" in the Corby case had never acquitted anyone in 500 cases. Not once. Zip.

The sentence itself is determined by bribes to the relevant parties. Whatever you pay will determine what the prosecutor asks for, and then what you get.

This isn't hearsay, foreign governments know it. They stay silent. They appease.

In the Corby case the Australians were so obsessed with hiding systemic corruption at their own airports, and in appeasing Indonesia, that they even suppressed the evidence which proved her innocence. It is there in their own cables. Their own correspondence. It is an unreported scandal.

The result is that we are here.

Instead of confronting Indonesian corruption, foreigner after foreigner is subjected to a show trial, or pays grotesque bribes. The west turns a blind eye.

Now look again at this case. It may not be as it appears.
The Indonesian judicial system is Jurassic. HERE: www.expendable.tv/20 11/10/bali-trial.htm l See how evidence was simply an inconvenience in the Schapelle Corby's case? See what they did to her for refusing a false confession to a crime she didn't commit? If you resist the bribes, and plead innocence, they crucify you. There is no concept of 'trial' there. None at all. The police determine the verdict. For example, the so-called "judge" in the Corby case had never acquitted anyone in 500 cases. Not once. Zip. The sentence itself is determined by bribes to the relevant parties. Whatever you pay will determine what the prosecutor asks for, and then what you get. This isn't hearsay, foreign governments know it. They stay silent. They appease. In the Corby case the Australians were so obsessed with hiding systemic corruption at their own airports, and in appeasing Indonesia, that they even suppressed the evidence which proved her innocence. It is there in their own cables. Their own correspondence. It is an unreported scandal. The result is that we are here. Instead of confronting Indonesian corruption, foreigner after foreigner is subjected to a show trial, or pays grotesque bribes. The west turns a blind eye. Now look again at this case. It may not be as it appears. MadammGeeky
  • Score: 0

8:31pm Tue 22 Jan 13

MSG says...

I dont care if she is innocent or guilty!

My problem is the British Government condemning the sentence. How dare they speak on my behalf as i did not vote for them. I support the death sentence in general.
I dont care if she is innocent or guilty! My problem is the British Government condemning the sentence. How dare they speak on my behalf as i did not vote for them. I support the death sentence in general. MSG
  • Score: 0

9:54pm Tue 22 Jan 13

spragger says...

Being in Redcar must have addled her brains
Being in Redcar must have addled her brains spragger
  • Score: 0

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